Difference between revisions of "Code of Conduct/Bots"

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(Bot code)
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* I think the code must be available for inspection, yes. I think that is only fair. But, I dont think we can require the bot author to apply an open source license to their code for this purpose. This might seem like splitting hairs, but its a significant issue. But I feel strongly that code needs to be available for inspection --[[User:RobertKaye|RobertKaye]] 21:29, 3 July 2012 (UTC)
 
* I think the code must be available for inspection, yes. I think that is only fair. But, I dont think we can require the bot author to apply an open source license to their code for this purpose. This might seem like splitting hairs, but its a significant issue. But I feel strongly that code needs to be available for inspection --[[User:RobertKaye|RobertKaye]] 21:29, 3 July 2012 (UTC)
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** I think my take on this is a wording like "We '''strongly prefer''' that bots be licensed under open-source licenses, but at the bare minimum the code must be public so we can inspect your algorithmic choices." I think you're right that we can't enforce a ''license'', only code-review, but I also think we agree that if possible we'd prefer everything to be full-fledged open-source, to aid reusability (especially if we want to implement something a bot does in musicbrainz-server itself!), etc. [[User:Ianmcorvidae|Ianmcorvidae]] 22:18, 3 July 2012 (UTC)

Revision as of 22:18, 3 July 2012

Proposed rules for bots:

Open edit limit

There is a recommended limit of 1000 open edits and a hard limit of 1500 open edits per bot at the same time. Any bot which goes over the hard limit will be blocked.


Voting

Bots themselves are not allowed to vote on any edits (to be implemented via code).

Yes-voting on bot edits is discouraged unless the voter can 100% confirm they're correct, since it helps them to go through with less eyes on them. If a bot edit gets rejected, a non-bot user can always re-enter it if he feels it's correct - reverting the edit is much more difficult, especially for removals and merges. This also applies to the bot owner: no matter how much you trust your code, manually verify everything before voting yes.

Bot owners should always be available to read and react to edit notes on their bot edits. If you're not going to be able to do so, don't run your bot until that changes.


Bot code

The code for every bot must be open-source and be linked from that bot's user page. Other bot owners, and the community in general, are encouraged to check, review and (if necessary) propose patches for them.

  • I think the code must be available for inspection, yes. I think that is only fair. But, I dont think we can require the bot author to apply an open source license to their code for this purpose. This might seem like splitting hairs, but its a significant issue. But I feel strongly that code needs to be available for inspection --RobertKaye 21:29, 3 July 2012 (UTC)
    • I think my take on this is a wording like "We strongly prefer that bots be licensed under open-source licenses, but at the bare minimum the code must be public so we can inspect your algorithmic choices." I think you're right that we can't enforce a license, only code-review, but I also think we agree that if possible we'd prefer everything to be full-fledged open-source, to aid reusability (especially if we want to implement something a bot does in musicbrainz-server itself!), etc. Ianmcorvidae 22:18, 3 July 2012 (UTC)