User:PavanChander/Database Overview

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Page notes
  • The release description below the <hr> is meant for the more detailed release page, the shorter description above is meant for the entity overview page.


Release group

A release group, just as the name suggests, is used to combine several releases into one group.

Both release groups and releases are very similar in a general sense, but they have an important difference. A release is a specific dated issuing of an album, i.e. what you might buy in a store; whereas a release group embraces the overall concept of an album, i.e. it encompasses all the different versions or editions that may have been released of that album. Every release in the database belongs to one, and only one, release group.

When an artist states, "We're releasing our new album soon", they're talking about a release group. When their publisher says "This new album gets released next week in Japan and next month in Europe", they're referring to the different releases that belong in that release group.

Examples

Release

A release represents the unique release (i.e. issuing) of a product on a specific date with specific release information such as the country, label, barcode, packaging etc. If you walk into a store and purchase an album, box set, or soundtrack, they're each represented in MusicBrainz as one release.

Examples


A release represents the unique release (i.e. issuing) of a product on a specific date with specific release information such as the country, label, barcode, packaging etc. If you walk into a store and purchase an album, boxset, or soundtrack, they're each represented in MusicBrainz as one release.

Each release belongs to a release group and contains at least one medium/tracklist (commonly referred to as a disc when talking about a CD release).

The easiest way to think about a medium is that it represents the actual physical medium the audio content is stored upon. This means that each CD in a multi-disc release will be entered on separate mediums. Mediums have a format (e.g. CD, DVD, vinyl, cassette, etc.) and can optionally also be titled.

Tracklists on the other hand represent the set and ordering of tracks as listed on a liner, and the same tracklist can appear on more than one release. For example, a boxset compilation of previously released albums might share its tracklists with those previous releases.

Examples